A Simran for Redfish

A Simran for Redfish

On Andros Island, some twenty years ago, a bonefish fly was developed  to match local shrimp. Called the Simran, it has since gained a reputation as a proven killer. And today many bonefish addicts consider it one of their favorite patterns.

Overall, it is a homely beast, and tied in a slightly unorthodox way. For one thing the dumbbell weight is not up by the hook eye, like a Crazy Charlie or Gotcha. Rather the weight is well back on the shank. Second, the tail of the fly curves up the hook bend (or perhaps you would say downward). Why these less common approaches? Both of them tend to roll the fly over; forcing it to ride hook up. Which makes the fly far less likely to snag when bounced along the bottom. (Frankly getting a fly to ride hook up isn’t all that easy. Truth is many of the patterns we assume do, don’t always perform well.)

A Simran for Redfish

A Simran for Redfish

I want to try a Simram for “reds” here in Florida’s Charlotte Harbor. But obviously, some changes are required. The original pattern is light tan. Great in the gin clear water of Andros, but not here. My waters are typically much darker. And because of it, I need a brighter shrimp color. Next, I want rubber legs. No question. When the Simran was created rubber legs weren’t in fashion. Today, that is not the case. We all know rubber legs help a fly’s appeal. Hell you can improve nearly any flats fly by adding them.

Simran for Redfish

A Simran for Redfish

Well, here it is my attempt, a pink Simran, with rubber legs. The fly pattern calls for rabbit fur. I had none in pink on hand, however. So I substituted pink Craft Fur Select. Should be Okay. The body is just built up white thread with a coat of glue. My hook is a size 4#, Mustad C70SD. The yellow dumbbell eye is a medium, 1/30 ounce. (That may be a bit heavy; we’ll see.) All said and done, it doesn’t look too bad. Will have to try it out soon.

Update  Took a few casts with the Simran. It landed hook up every time. Nice. Tracked straight and looked good in the water too.

 

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An Unweighted Crab Fly

Crabs live on the bottom; we all know that. So its no surprise that most crab flies are heavily weighted. In fact some are even a bear to cast. But, hey you want the crab fly to get down fast. Right? But does that mean an unweighted crab fly is no good? Hardly.

Unweighted Crab Fly

An Unweighted Crab Fly

When fishing for “tailing” redfish (or bonefish for that matter) in skinny water you’ll likely need an unweighted crab fly. Why? The fly has to land silently or you’ll spook the fish.  And a weighted crab fly invariably lands with a “kerplunk”. What about the sink rate you ask? Given the water is apt to be no more that knee deep, you simply give the unweighted fly a second to settle before starting your retrieve. Not a problem. If you’re fishing in water between knee and thigh deep, you can add a bead-chain eye to speed up the descent. But avoid a very heavy fly, unless you can lead a cruising fish by at least a five feet or more.

Unweighted Crab Fly

An Unweighted Crab Fly

I’m going to use this fly on “tailing reds”. It rides a size 2# hook with no added weight. The tail is Craft Fur Select. The body is Woolly Chenille. It has black “EP” mono crab eyes. Since “reds” often “tail” in turtle grass, I’ve added a 30lb mono weed guard to avoid getting snagged up at the last moment. I hate when that happens.

Yes, the fly has rubber legs too. (Don’t leave home without them.) In the past, I attached rubber legs back by the bend of the fly. Now I always tie them in towards the eye, for two reasons. This spreads the legs and allows for more action. (Sounds like a sex flick) Second, after a fish or two the legs tend to break off. Tied in at the eye, they are easy to replace.

Lastly, I’ve deliberately make this fly to look both crab and shrimp-like. In other words its more impressionistic, than realistic. In the end I’ll let the fish decide.

 

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A Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod

Part Two: Okay, once again we’re focused on a Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod. In the previous post, we examined its basics makeup, including reel seat, grip, wraps and so on. And we also took a brief look at the Diamondback Rod Company’s history. In this post we’ll be checking out how the rod casts.

A Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod

A Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod

For this field test, I loaded a 4-weight Cortland 444 double taper. (Irony there. Cortland likely owned Diamondback when this rod was built.) Well, surprise, surprise. As soon as I got the rod outside, I realized it cast like no other 4-weight “glass” rod I own. What’s the difference? Its “faster”, able to throw a very tight loop, with ease. Truth is, given how quickly the tip “recovers” from every casting stroke, you might assume this was a graphite rod. Rod taper could be part of it, but I believe the key reason lies elsewhere. All my rods are made from E-glass; Diamondglass rods are S2 glass. I’m told S2 is stronger, stiffer, and lighter than traditional E-glass. And capable of producing a “faster” action as well. (Epic fly rods immediately come to mind. These popular New Zealand “glass” rods are S2, and widely touted as “Fast Glass”)

Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod

Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod

The Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight did a fair job casting 3.5 feet of fly line plus a 9-foot leader (no fly). At 6 feet of fly line, things improved. A tight loop formed, better turning over the leader. With over 12 feet of fly line the rod got silky smooth, just loafing around, flexing mainly in the upper third. At that point I noticed two things, however. The Diamondglass created virtually no “shock wave” in the forward cast, a testimony to the tip’s rapid recovery. Second, the rod was deadly accurate. I mean it.

Eighteen feet of fly line flexed the Diamondglass 8-foot,4-weight fly rod down into the midsection. It felt like a “glass” rod, and the loop started to open too. After that I extended the cast out gradually to 50 feet without problem. Space restrictions forced me to end there.

What’s the bottom line here? If you want a traditional, full-flex “glass” rod, this Diamondglass isn’t your baby. Even if you require a rod ideal for working in extremely close with 8x tippets, I’d say a softer fly rod better suits you. Look elsewhere.

On the other hand, if you’d like a rod that bridges the gap between traditional “glass’ and modern graphite, Diamondglass delivers elements of both worlds. (Diamondglass is not unlike the earliest graphite rods back in the 1970’s, well before the modulus wars hit.) The rod throws a tighter loop than any E-glass I’ve seen. Yet it is not a stiff, tip-action graphite rod. It is pin-point accurate. It is apt to handle indicator nymph rigs better than an E-glass rod, be more useful on windy days, and more effective at mending line. All of this while still maintaining a “glass-like” feel. Lastly if you fish where light lines and large fish meet, this rod has the backbone to turn a big trout. Honestly, I’m impressed by its performance.

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A Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod

Part one: Alright! Got another fiberglass flea flicker to talk about. This time around its a Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod. This black beauty came out of an estate sale, in Vermont. The rod may be 8 or more years old, but is in unused condition. The tube even has the original cellophane wrapper. Quite a nice find.

Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod

Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod

This wand was made by the Diamondback company. (Later I’ll share the little I know about their history) It is an American-made rod, the blank is black, 2-piece, with a very slim tip-over-butt ferrule. The reel seat is single “uplocking”. Given its bright shine, it is likely German silver.  The insert appears to be rosewood. The 6.5″ grip is reverse-wells with a near superfine taper. The rod has one stripping guide,and 8 snakes, plus a tiptop. All wraps are dark red tipped in clear (a little reminiscent of Winston glass rods). And the rod weights in at 3.1 ounces. Overall, the workmanship is of the highest order. Without a doubt, a great deal of skill and care went into its construction.

Weight of 3.1 ounces

A Diamondglass 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod weight in at 3.1 ounces

Among fiberglass fanatics, these “original” American-made Diamondglass rods have an underground cult following. To this day, rumors revolve around their fine casting ability and the quality of the build. So when I finally came across one, I immediately jumped on it.

In the next post I’ll give you my opinion of this rod’s performance, but for the time being, allow me to tell you the little I know about the Diamondback Company.

Diamondglass, 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod reel seat

Diamondglass, 8-foot, 4-weight fly rod reel seat

To the best of my knowledge, the original company was started in the 1980’s by Billy Alley. It was locate in Stowe, Vermont and attached to Bill’s business called The Fly Rod Shop.

In 1991, Diamondback was taken over by Baron Merle-Smith, who greatly built up the brand selling both graphite and glass fly rods. Around 1998, Cortland stepped in and purchased Diamondback. For a time the rods continued to be built in the same way they had been prior. In a cost saving move, however, Cortland eventually decided to have the rod blanks built in China (Those “glass” blanks are blue in color). And then in 2006 Cortland closed down the entire Diamondback operation.

A year or two ago, Diamondback reopened their doors under new ownership. They are now located in Central New York and offering an E-glass fly rod called the Meeker. Can anyone out there add anything about Diamondglass fly rods? Love to hear from you.

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Permit in Charlotte Harbor?

Permit in Charlotte Harbor? Well, they are found outside in the Gulf. But I have fished in the harbor for several years and never seen a one. Okay, their close cousin the Florida pompano is certainly there. I’ve caught them. And you could easily mistake one for a permit. But if asked, I would have told you permit are not in Charlotte Harbor.

Permit in Charlotte Harbor?

Permit in Charlotte Harbor?

 

Pompano on a 6-Weight Fly rod

Florida Pompano

Last winter at a meeting of the Pine Island Fly Fishers, I learned otherwise. A fisheries person informed us that small juvenile permit do in fact exist in Charlotte Harbor. Man, I was surprised. And then more recently, low and behold, my friend Dave caught one on a fly! Yes it was, as announced, a small juvenile permit. But hey, its permit just the same.

Separating a small permit from a Florida Pompano requires a close eye. Perhaps the most distinguishing feature of the permit is the fact that the dorsal and anal fins are in a direct line. A pompano’s dorsal fin starts ever so slightly forward of the anal fin. The permit also has a  longer forked tail and a steeper forehead. As you can see in the photo above the pompano’s forehead slopes back gradually.

Pompano / Permit Comparison Chart

Pompano / Permit Comparison Chart

This chart shows more differences. Besides what I mentioned above, note that the permit has longer dorsal and anal fins. Obviously permit grow much larger too, often reaching 40 pounds. Florida pompano never attain that size. In Charlotte Harbor they are commonly in the 1-2 pound range, although 5 pounders are around at times. And Florida pompano are known to reach upwards of 8 pounds. But that’s tops.

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Fly-Fishing on Block Island

Two weeks ago, Captain Pete Farrell called. He was summering on Block Island and  invited me to come over and catch a striper or two. Man, I jumped at the chance. Hey, I hadn’t done any fly-fishing on Block Island in over 20 years.

Fly-Fishing on Block Island

Fly-Fishing on Block Island

Shortly after I hopped the Block Island Ferry out of Point Judith. Shaped like a pork chop, the island lies hard to the North Atlantic some 10 plus miles off the Rhode Island coast. Dutch explorer Adrian Block is credited with discovering the Block in 1614, and then sixteen hardy souls settled there in 1661. And the island has been busy ever since.

As islands go, the Block isn’t especially large, measuring about 6 miles long and 4 miles wide, but it is a place of enormous rugged beauty. In fact the Nature Conservancy calls it “One of the 12 last great places in the Western Hemisphere.”

Huge striped bass prowl these waters, especially in deep haunts well off the beach.

Block Island

Block Island

And Pete knows how to find them, believe me. But I was far more interested in his offer to sight-fish Block Island’s Great Salt Pond. And that is what we did.

As you can see in the top photo, our sight-fishing adventure was successful. Yes, big bass from a big boat, in big water is never bad, but sight-fishing in the shallows is always far more fun. My friend you just can’t beat seeing and casting to cruising fish in gin clear water.

Pete had use of a 16′ flats boat in  the “Pond”. So we were all set. The striper in the above image latched on to a small white half-half, and then took me right to the backing. Very cool. I hope to return to the Block again this summer.

 

 

 

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Father and Son Anglers

How does that old saying go? The acorn never falls far from the tree. Plenty of truth in those words. And I guess that’s no surprise. Like father like son right? Things get passed along from generation to generation. It happens all the time. So if dad likes to fish, his son might like fishing too. Yes, father and son anglers. There is no fighting DNA.

Father and Son Anglers Photo Credit Phil Farnsworth

Father and Son Anglers
Photo Credit Phil Farnsworth

Last week my buddy Phil flew in from California. Phil has a mountain of photo experience, more than anyone else I know. So I asked him to swing by and take a shot of me and the son. I love how it came out.

Now I’m mainly a fly guy. My son is mainly spin /plug. But hey angling is angling no matter how you cut it. And get this, the fishing bug hit both of us around the same time of life. Is that magic or what? OK, he is younger, taller, smarter and better looking than his old man. But we’re still very much the same. We both love being on the water. We both love everything about the fishing. The chase, the tackle, the tactics, the Kahuna that got away. Yeah we’re both cut from the same cloth. Father and son anglers. My friends it doesn’t get any cooler that that.

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Using a Fly-Fishing Lanyard

We all love our fly-fishing vests. When they were first invented (Lee Wulff?) they were little more than a shirt with a couple of cargo pockets. Nowadays they are far more elaborate. Hell they might have a dozen pockets or more. Man, that makes vests very handy and capable of carrying a ton of tackle. But that’s a problem too. Vests can hold so much stuff, we end up tempted to lug around every fly and gadget we own – way more gear than we actually need. In fact a fly-fishing vest can balloon into something so big you need a Sherpa to help you around!

Recently, after a long day on the stream, my vest was killing me. It felt like I was carting a

Using a Fly-Fishing Lanyard

Using a Fly-Fishing Lanyard

ton of brick. So the following day I weighed it. Lordy, lordy, it was a shade over 8 pounds! And its only a “shortie” vest.  Now 8 pounds might not sound like a lot, but over the course of day it takes a toll, believe me. Especially if the load doesn’t land exactly right. It needs to be out on your shoulders, not around your neck.

Several years ago I purchased a fly-fishing lanyard. Frankly at the time, lanyards were new to the marketplace, and I wasn’t sure how valuable they might be. But they looked worthy of a try.

Well,  it turns out I like lanyards. They are light, and quite comfortable. I opt to use mine during the warmest months, when typically I fish with a reduced selection of flies – a few dries (including terrestrials), a few nymphs, and a few wets or soft hackles. A lanyard is perfect for the dog days of summer.

Using a fly-fishing lanyard forces you to be a minimalist. After all you’re paring down to the bare essentials. Less has to be more. So you plan ahead. As you can see in the photo, I have one small fly box (You can carry another one in your wader pouch, along with your nippers.), floatant, forceps,  a couple of indicators, leader straightener, and the necessary tippet spools. (Want a small LED light too? It might end up in your waders or on the brim of your hat.) That’s it! Total weight you ask. Ounces not pounds. And its cool even on the hottest July day.

When using a fly-fishing lanyard, balance the gear on the right and left sides, such that the lanyard hangs with the metal clip straight down. What clip? At the base of a lanyard is a

Using a Fly-Fishing Lanyard

Using a Fly-Fishing Lanyard

small metal clip you connect to the top of your waders (Or even your shorts if you’re wading wet). This clip may not look unimportant but it is. If you fail to use it, when you bend forward to land and release a fish, the lanyard will swing out in your face. A nuisance that can be avoided.

Give lanyards a try. I bet you enjoy them. If you’re the  handy type, you can make your own, just be sure to add a little padding in the neck area.And use a strong chord.

 

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The “Sulphur” Hatch on the Farmington River

Part Four:  In the following days I waded as many pools and runs as I could. It was a vivid reminder of how much terrific trout water exists on this river. Naturally my main goal throughout stayed the same – to fish and learn about the “sulphur” hatch on the Farmington River.

Farmington River

Farmington River

For the duration of my trip, this year’s “sulphur” hatch continued to prove difficult to nail down. I saw duns appear as early as 11:30am, and as late as 7:45pm. And on more than one occasion, the hatch came off twice in the same day – once in the afternoon and once in the evening. Typically the afternoon hatches were the weaker of the two, being shorter in duration and containing fewer duns. That said, the afternoon events hosted less anglers which allowed you a better shot at the fish. And in the evening, there was an increasing number of smaller duns down to size 18#.

When the hatch wasn’t underway,  I resorted to nymphs, trying indicator-style and tight line Euro-style. Both methods caught fish. Primary I stuck with bead-head caddis pupa.  My indicator was a product new to me, called an Air-Lock. Unlike other indicators, these employ a threaded slot to grasp the leader. It worked well, although the threaded assembly is small and a bit hard to handle, particularly midstream. Once it is in place,however, it can be quickly moved up or down and doesn’t kink the leader. Good news.

During off periods, caddis pupa such as Rich Strolis' Rock Candy worked

During slow periods, caddis pupa such as Rich Strolis’ Rock Candy worked

Air Lock Indicator

Air Lock Indicator

Overall, I enjoyed fishing the”sulphur’ hatch on the Farmington River, but found it challenging. Now, perhaps I just hit the hatch in an “off”year. Such things can happen. Regardless, I feel confident in making the following recommendations.  If you come for the hatch, be sure to have “emergers” in your fly box. If you get caught without them, hang a size 16 pheasant tail nymph about a foot off the bend of a dry. Could save the day. And you’ll need “sulphur”dries in three sizes 14,16, and 18# – along with a selection of  “sulphur” spinners. Also in your dry fly box should be size 16# tan caddis, Isonychias in 10# and 12#, and don’t forget to bring Usuals.

Blue Sky Foods

Blue Sky Foods

In closing, let me mention two fun places in New Hartford. If you’re feeling hungry, Blue Sky Foods on route 44# is a gem, serving up good food with a funky Caribbean flare. Off Greenwoods road, by the Ovation guitar factory, is a new spot called the Parrott-Delaney tavern. Excellent food and a fine selection of craft beers. Enjoy!

 

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The “Sulphur” Hatch on the Farmington River

Part Three: Bright and early the following morning I stopped into Upcountry Sportfishing, located right on route 44 in New Hartford.  Upcountry is fly-fishing central in these parts. Besides being a well-run, well stocked fly shop – the kind that’s harder and harder to find these days – Upcountry has a very informative website with river reports, weather, guides, and lodging.

My Vest and a Kabuto Fly Rod

Vest and a Kabuto Fly Rod

In the shop I ran into Bruce Marino. Bruce has been wading these waters for years as a full-time, year-round Farmington River guide, and noted fly tyer.  Bruce quickly confirmed what I saw the previous day. He told me the “sulphurs” can come off much earlier than expected. And he added they can also come off again around 5pm. And there are even day when the “sulphurs” may wait until nightfall before appearing. In other words, the “sulphur” hatch on the Farmington River can be unpredictable.

Then I told Bruce about my lack of luck with dries. He wasn’t at all surprised. He said the trout often show little interest in the “sulphur” dun and spend much of their time keyed to the “emerger”. As Bruce put it: “It pays to get the fly wet.”

That evening I fished down river down in Collingsville with Gary Steinmiller. Gary is a highly skilled angler and president of the Connecticut Fly Fisherman’s Association. We got in around 4:30pm. There was no action to speak of until near 7pm. At that point we saw “sulphurs”, “isonychias”, and a few “cahills’ come off. This time Rick Strolis’ “shucked up emerger” worked very well indeed, taking several good fish. Gary caught several very nice trout too, including a big chunky rainbow that put up a real show, running the pool.

Francis Better 's Usual

Francis Better ‘s Usual – note red thread in body

As darkness descended, I was having trouble seeing the “emerger” so I switched to a Usual,  a great dry fly invented in the Adirondacks by the late Francis Betters. The Usual looks deceptively simple, but believe me it can be a killer. It rewarded me with the final fish of the night, a heavy brown of near 18 inches that bent my Kabuto glass fly rod right down into the corks. Exciting fishing!

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