Poppers are Wild

Now here’s a happy angler with a beautiful bass on a popper. Its a true thrill, one every saltwater fly rodder should experience. But I’ll venture to say that not many anglers have had the pleasure. Sure, they may have caught a few schoolies on a popper, but never used a popper to hunt for big fish.

Why are poppers underutilized flies? Well, for a slew of reasons. First, they are not as universally effective as a subsurface fly like a Lefty’s Deceiver or a Bob Clouser’s Deep Minnow. Those flies work in wider range of situations. Second, poppers are more operator intensive. You need to know how to work them, and when to set the hook. And there is more.

Third, poppers typically use long shank, stainless steel hooks which make them vulnerable to opening up under heavy pressure. So don’t be a damn hero, don’t slam the hook home. In fact, with a striper, wait until the fly goes under before striking. That’s super tough for some guys, they just have to bang the fish right off. Fourth, don’t apply maximum pressure constantly during the fight, remember that longshank hook. Keep a cool head.

And lastly poppers are harder to cast. Practice before throwing one, believe me. Practice. Given all that are poppers worth it? You bet. At times a big bass will swirl under a popper several time before taking it. Man your heart will be pounding, amigo. And when they do grab, the strike is memorable. You got to love it. Poppers are wild.

 

Posted on by Ed Mitchell | Leave a comment

Sight-Fishing for Snook

Sight-Fishing for Snook

My buddy Dave, the “Fish Whisper”, has been stalking snook on Florida’s Gulf Coast. Got himself a true corker this time, as you can see below. That must have been wa hoot. Way to go Dave!

A few days back, Dave saw a group of snook laid up. By this time of year, they have boogied from their winter haunts in the backcountry, and returned to open water. He found them bunched up in small pods on top of a bar, finning in the current.

Dave’s fly of choice was a meaty 5inch Lefty’s Deceiver, tied on a Gamakatsu  1/0 SC 15 hook. To ensure the fly landed softly, he didn’t add any epoxy or eyes. Dave tells me trying to get a fly close to a big snook is extremely difficult. They spook easily. A bit of a breeze rippling the surface helps, as does keeping your backcast low. Well, he got it right this time, as he usually does.

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Follow Structure and Current

Follow Structure and Current

Phone credit   Ed J. Mitchell

Striped bass gravitate to the best habitat. That where you’ll always find them. And the best habitat holds the best structure and current.

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Not All Tackle Shops Are?

Not All Tackle Shops Are ?

Not all tackle shops are friendly. And not all tackle shops can spell.

 

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Worms Again!

Worms Again!

Well the Rhode Island worm bite is still in gear. No, not everywhere mind you, but in some spots. Doubt it can last much longer if the water temperature keep rising.  At some point the bass will be forced to boogie back to cooler water.

The picture below shows Captain Pete Farrell fishing a worm hatch. As usual Pete is busy catching bass. Dude is hard core. Nice going Pete!

Captain Pete Farrell       photo credit Phil Farnsworth

Got an interesting worm fly to show you. It was tied by Mark Lewchik, who is widely known for being fabulous at the vise, cranking out wonderful flies for both fresh and saltwater.

Mark Lewchik’s Worm Fly

This puppy is near 1.5 inches long and rides a size 2 hook. Looks like a Gamakatsu to me? The body is hollow and sealed, permitting it to float.

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