A Simran for Redfish

A Simran for Redfish

On Andros Island, some twenty years ago, a bonefish fly was developed  to match local shrimp. Called the Simran, it has since gained a reputation as a proven killer. And today many bonefish addicts consider it one of their favorite patterns.

Overall, it is a homely beast, and tied in a slightly unorthodox way. For one thing the dumbbell weight is not up by the hook eye, like a Crazy Charlie or Gotcha. Rather the weight is well back on the shank. Second, the tail of the fly curves up the hook bend (or perhaps you would say downward). Why these less common approaches? Both of them tend to roll the fly over; forcing it to ride hook up. Which makes the fly far less likely to snag when bounced along the bottom. (Frankly getting a fly to ride hook up isn’t all that easy. Truth is many of the patterns we assume do, don’t always perform well.)

A Simran for Redfish

A Simran for Redfish

I want to try a Simram for “reds” here in Florida’s Charlotte Harbor. But obviously, some changes are required. The original pattern is light tan. Great in the gin clear water of Andros, but not here. My waters are typically much darker. And because of it, I need a brighter shrimp color. Next, I want rubber legs. No question. When the Simran was created rubber legs weren’t in fashion. Today, that is not the case. We all know rubber legs help a fly’s appeal. Hell you can improve nearly any flats fly by adding them.

Simran for Redfish

A Simran for Redfish

Well, here it is my attempt, a pink Simran, with rubber legs. The fly pattern calls for rabbit fur. I had none in pink on hand, however. So I substituted pink Craft Fur Select. Should be Okay. The body is just built up white thread with a coat of glue. My hook is a size 4#, Mustad C70SD. The yellow dumbbell eye is a medium, 1/30 ounce. (That may be a bit heavy; we’ll see.) All said and done, it doesn’t look too bad. Will have to try it out soon.

Update  Took a few casts with the Simran. It landed hook up every time. Nice. Tracked straight and looked good in the water too.

 

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